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20121202
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that, but on the theological debate, that's how do you reconcile with science definitively establishes what your what faith teaches? with the age of the earth, there's no conflict. in the beginning, god created the heavens and earth, and the scientific advances allowed us, given us insight into when and how he did it, but i believe god did it. that's how i reconcile that. that's consistent with the teachings of my church. other people have a deeper con flipght. i think in america, we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever we believe, and that means teaching them science. they have to know science, but parents have the right to teach theology and reconcile the two things as they believe and see fit, and i think that's the point the president was making back in 2007 when he was asked the question. that's what i was saying. >> accepting that, how old is the earth? >> science says it's -- my faith teaches it's not inconsistent, but god great created the universe. god creates help and earth, and science gives us insight. the more science learned, the more i'm convinced that
in south florida as great a strain folks at entry point, there is science and progress of human trafficking. awareness part is important. they have to take the place when the internet for law enforcement because a lot of times they find themselves into prostitution and get treated as perpetrator rather than victims. if ecologists force them into a perpetrator but in fact we are the dems and they have to give him for certain judicial system to treat a women as victims and put them in a setting with a pull themselves away from drug addiction or whatever it's supposed appendices seem to keep them trapped. >> first i want to ask you a couple twitter questions that have come in what we've been talking here. one is who's the best meter in washington? >> robert griffing. [laughter] >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party? >> i think it was an election. it was a very close election when he looked than others and differences between. there is their free enterprise may maintain we need to improve on the way they connect those policies of the everyday life of everyday people.
is my wonderful co-authored it is a professor to of political science and political philosophy and art. many years ago when we were both at princeton university week co-taught a course on ethics and public policy, and that led to as co-operate several books on deliberation and democracy. >> in the spirit of compromise, you give it to legislate examples. 1986 tax reform health care act. if you would, walk us through those. >> so this is a tale of two compromises. and it begins with ronald reagan presidency where tax reform was a huge and important issue and a hugely difficult issue to get done between the republicans and democrats. those of us who lived through the reagan era recognizes that people thought they were very polarized. tip o'neill was a staunch little too liberal democrat and reagan's staunch conservative republican. yes, they crafted a bipartisan compromise. part of the movers of that compromise. test for to the affordable care act. it ven more difficult to craft a compromise within one party, the democratic party, because of the permanent campaign and helped not just pol
. and for those who are unfamiliar with the term "stem" it stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. the hard sciences that we have too few in terms of graduates from our colleges and universities. this bill passed in the house of representatives with 245 votes, and was originally sponsored by my friend and colleague, lamar smith of texas, and is very similar to a piece of legislation i myself have introduced earlier this year. the goal of this legislation is one that i think is -- enjoys broad bipartisan support, and that is to help the united states retain more of the highly skilled immigrants who come to study at our colleges and universities. in particular, this bill would make eligible for a green card those who graduate in the stem fields who get a master's degree or a ph.d. and so we would not add to the net number of green cards that would be eligible, there is 55,000 diversity lottery visa green cards that would be substituted for by these stem green cards. now, we all know that america's immigration system is broken, and, unfortunately, it's a self-inflicted wound in many
of pharmacy and health sciences. >> we're in the university at albany library's department of special collections and archives, and we're the main repository on campus for collecting archival records, historical records and primary sources that are used by students, teachers, professors, scholars, journalists and many others to do historical research. [background sounds] >> the national death penalty archive was started here at the university at albany in 2001. it was a partnership between the around conservativist -- archivists here and faculty members in the school of criminal justice. there is no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first death penalty archive. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital punishment or are proponents of capital punishment. and these individuals and organization form the ideas that frame the debate that goes on both in the legal arena and in the political arena over t
with science definitively established with what you may think -- for me when it comes to the age of the earth there is a concept a i believe god created the heavens and earth. i think the scientific advances have allowed us to have given us insight into when he did and how did you but i still believe god did. that's the i been able to reconcile that. other people have a keeper -- i think in america we should have the freedom to teach our children whatever it is we believe. that means teaching them size. they have to know the science but also parents have the right to have theology and reconcile that. as they believe in secret. i think that's the point the president was making. back in 2007 when he was asked that question. that's what i was saying. >> we will accept it in the context. >> our faith, my faith says god created the universe. he created the beginning out of nothing. god created the heaven and the earth's. scientists have decided we needed and how he did it. the more sides learned, the more i'm convinced that god created it. [inaudible] >> later returned to the catholic church. spin
we miss the mark, we have got to study this. we have got to make it a discipline of science and say how can we look at this like we look at cancer? where are the cracks? where the mistakes? that was the main reason i decided to go down this path. >> host: that statistic of 30% in quality, waste and variability is a stunning statistic. why do you think that, and you mentioned culture a little while ago. what is it about the culture of health care, where those types of activities have been allowed to go on for such a length of time. if you look at any other industry, 30% waste or 30% error rate really would be unacceptable. how does that occur within health care? >> you know it's a great wondered why people tolerate 30% waste and health care but they wouldn't tolerated in any other industry. i saw a statistic recently in a report, the average income of an american in the united states gone up about 30% over the last decade. the increase in health care costs that they are paying have gone up about 68% over the same time period. essentially we have offset the increases in income with in
'll be joint staffers who are doing the real science and math on this on exactly what formations, what capabilities, and, therefore, how many civilians and military need to remain. i think that if you go to one end of the spectrum and go with just a few thousand soldiers, that's not enough to really secure yourself or do either too well. i think that's what my own research is doing. talking to a lot of smarter people in the week here in the capital region. if you go very large, you could run the risk of having the security forces from afghanistan become too reliant in those areas upon us because we're there taking care of them. i think they can be mitigated, i really do. there's got to be a really good, i think, science to exactly how you approach troops to task based upon the missions that we're given. that really is what needs to happen militarily. economically, we've got to stay informed in the -- invested in the region. you've got to have security forces. it's a sustainable force that works for afghans in the outyears. at the same time, diplomatically you've got to continue reconci
choosing your capitalist. there was one of those typical, business and social science. one of those typical varieties of capitalism's. they have a nicer capitalism in the street. we have a more rampant cowboy capitalist. and a very myopic kind of discussion because it failed to see the extent to which european capitalism has become so americanized. you know, the european union is more open, if anything, to much of what we have been discussing in terms of free capital flows and deregulation than any other. so it has been in myopic discussion. but i think everyone now does recognize this is the capitol system. and hopefully people will get beyond looking for a better variety of capitalism and use the kind of democratizing language your speaking of to try to get to somewhere else. get to a better society that is not structured in terms of capitalist social relations and the drive to capital. >> do things. [inaudible] agreed to help and to privatize so that they stand aside. create our own. [indiscernible] >> yes. i think a central theme of the book is, to some extent, the type of reforms. for
is with us. the science is clear. national security establishments all know that this is real. there is a rearguard action in this building but i polluters to try to prevent us in taking action on this. we have to face the fact that deniers are wrong. they are just dead wrong. whatever motivations may be, they are wrong and we have to deal with that and i think some of the courtesy we've given to one another collegially really have to yield to the fact that some of the things said in the senate and equitably in this committee chamber just plain wrong. sandy shows the price of not being attentive to these facts in a thank you for your leadership, madam chair. >> senator, i want to thank you for your remarks. i feel, as you do, that the clock is ticking and hurricane sandy has shown us all what the scientist sitting right in this room today i got the goupil all were sitting right there and told us exactly what would happen and it's all happening. you can close your eyes and cover your ears and put a pillow over your head, but anyone with a heart beat and he pulls can tell that t
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
upon restrictions not supported by sound science. so now i'm going to tell you about some problems i have with russia even though i want russia to be in the w.t.o. and i want this legislation to pass so it can be fully implemented. now i would say some things that we have problems. let's take pork exports as an example. in 2008, u.s. pork sales to russia totaled over 200,000 metric tons, and since that time, exports have fallen nearly 60% due to russia's reduced import quotas and questionable sanitary and phyto sanitary restrictions. i'm pleased our trade negotiators were able to negotiate a satisfactory trade rate quota for our pork, but this administration under president obama has fallen short in its obligation to stand up with u.s. farmers on these sanitary and phyto-sanitary standards. in other words, using sound science instead of some i illegitimate reason for keeping our products out of russia. i have communicated time and again what i expected of this administration because they have to negotiate for us. in june 2011, i led a bipartisan letter with senators nelson and 26 oth
in an edition of popular science that there was an experimental program called the invisible i and it was a program that was a precursor to the contact lenses. so he got on the train, went into new york and got enrolled in the program and got his set of invisible eyes. so he went to the recruiting station and watched how they did the examination. he watched the navy and the navy had one line. he would go down the line and get your physical exam. he would get your psychological exam and then your eye exam. then he watched the coast guard and the coast guard had two lines. the first one was for your physical exam and then your psychological exam and then if you pass that they told you to get into the other line for your eye exam. so he figured that would give him just enough time to slip the contact lenses into his eyes, which he did. the recruiter said, read the bottom line. he said, how far down? he said as far read retro so the sailor read. he said what you're reading? he said i'm reading the bottom line. he said, you are reading patent sentence so you clearly have the eyes of
events are allowed the office of science and technology policy to identify work apps are. you can discuss value in a couple different ways. primarily whether it is valuable to democracy and people holding the government accountable, or valuable to companies such as members of my coalition of want to use it for new business opportunities or both. our coalition focuses on both vote for democracy and business opportunities are still not disclosed or standardized. although there is incremental progress without a legislative agenda, i think the white house can't get there. >> this is good and that leads us to the causal part of the program of the convening, perhaps. so we were talking about institutionalization. we have seen efforts along those lines. the open government initiative and direct it, although it certainly hasn't -- it's translated into something to get agencies moving in the same direction. we saw more of the principle problem with the leadership is saying do this and agencies were saying no, no. it was the mid-level folks. some of this is perhaps a one point ethics czar. norm ici
actual science and claims management. our new role is to create an integrated delivery model driven by primary care providers that use and share data at the point of care, to improve expwrowt comes, -- outcomes, lower cost, and create a better health care experience. at humana, our model integrates delivery, data support for clinicians, pharmaceuticals, and wellness and productivity platforms. in many ways, our model is an evolution with its roots prevalent 20-30 years ago. today's simplicity is the key. we believe in integrated model that emphasizes primary care that can provide outcomes or the cost of care, and, especially to patients with critical or complex medical needs including the patients in the medicare and medicaid programs. the con cement relies on primary care physicians to coordinate care for patients helping them navigate the health care system so they can receive the right care, the right place, at the right time. like many organizations and industries, technology plays such an important role in enabling this to happen. we are investing in today, data analytics capab
than myself and the big pocket it lined with drusy. >>host: there you had it. there the science behind that it is fascinating and it is interestingtalk about these rocks that literally date back 500 million years. that is the outside and inside you have little pockets little cavities with the herkimer form in order for us to create the today's special you go through and sort only the best rough. this is best of the best. it top grade quality is not get better for a hardcover. if you are looking an earring with sparkle and pizazz and personality -- it does not get better than the herkimer.getting these. these a so much fun. they are a starter they will say those earrings are beautiful what are you wearing? when you give these as a gift they will not it you can only find herkimer today's special boutique. in japan they love her car. -- herkimer, nobody sells it for less than $50.this is a special one day only offer. read the in pennsylvania who is shopping today. -- ritahere that you had ordered for pairs >>caller: one pair for me and three pairs as christmas gifts. it will be hard
quite a successful science company in our state for over 200 years. we have cars. we built a lot of cars over the years, g.m. and chrysler products. over half of the new york stock exchange, half the fortune 500, being credit card business in our state. the coast of our state is the site of the nation's summer capital, rehoboth beach and a bunch of other places. the letter "c" has been pretty big. people say why do they call you the first state? we're the first colony that threw off the yoke of the british tyranny and at the same time said pennsylvania take a hike, we want to be a state on our own. 225 years from tomorrow to be exact, the first state to ratify the constitution. but we have the best beaches in the country. last year i think there were four or five-star beaches in america, two in delaware. rehoboth and dewey. the best air force base in the world. we have, i think, the finest judiciary, finest judicial system in the state. we have the best financial controls and financial controls and cash management system. we have a triple-a credit rate system. we continue to have that ki
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)